How To Succeed When You Suck At Everything

2/19/14 10:20AM EST

How To Succeed When You Suck At Everything How To Succeed When You Suck At Everything

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How many time have you heard some version of the following phrases?

  • Everyone has a special skill!
  • You just need to practice!
  • You haven’t tried everything yet!
  • You better work out what special skill you have and then use it for the rest of your life because if you don’t you’ll live in a dumpster fighting with cats for food!

That’s all well and fine for people who are good at things, but what if you just suck at everything? Here’s how to succeed when you are just plain awful at everything:

1. Realize You Probably Don’t Actually Suck

In reality, it’s impossible to be good at every single thing you try – unless you’re Will Smith – but that doesn’t necessarily mean you suck. It’s all about perspective and how you define whether you’re good at something. For instance, are you basing how bad you are at something on your own standards or are you comparing yourself to others? If it’s the latter then you need to stop and remind yourself that we are all individuals. You’re not inferior or inept, you’re completely different and unique you special snowflake. Insecurities and doubts limit your potential, so if you intend to succeed you must first get rid of them.

2. Remember We’re All Rookies

Although it may appear to come naturally to other people, the abilities they possess are the result of practice, not some birthright or Matrix-style programming. Yes, they may find it easier to equip particular skills than you do, but remember what I said about comparing yourself to others? Everybody starts at the same line but we decide our own pace.

3. Combine And Build Upon Your Mediocre Skills

I’ll stop being all feely now and actually give you some practical advice. Individual specialties are great, but combined skills are rarer and arguably more sought-after. You may not be the best, but you may be the only one with a particular combination of seemingly mediocre abilities. Think about what you enjoy doing most rather than what you’re best at, mush them all together and see what you can get out of the resulting eclectic ball of skills.